Home Diocese Church Fiscal Managers Urged to be Transparent, Have Spiritual Vision

Church Fiscal Managers Urged to be Transparent, Have Spiritual Vision

642
People attend the annual meeting of the Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference in Atlanta Sept. 29. More than 325 fiscal professionals representing dioceses in the United States, Canada and other countries participated in the Sept. 27-30 conference, which had transparency, compassion and vision as themes for its numerous workshops. (CNS photo/Michael Alexander, Georgia Bulletin)
People attend the annual meeting of the Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference in Atlanta Sept. 29. More than 325 fiscal professionals representing dioceses in the United States, Canada and other countries participated in the Sept. 27-30 conference, which had transparency, compassion and vision as themes for its numerous workshops. (CNS photo/Michael Alexander, Georgia Bulletin)
People attend the annual meeting of the Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference in Atlanta Sept. 29. More than 325 fiscal professionals representing dioceses in the United States, Canada and other countries participated in the Sept. 27-30 conference, which had transparency, compassion and vision as themes for its numerous workshops. (CNS photo/Michael Alexander, Georgia Bulletin)

ATLANTA (CNS) — The Catholic Church’s assets are intended for the advancement of its mission and never for the mere increase of wealth, Atlanta’s archbishop told attendees at the annual meeting of the Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference. Mishandling of church funds also carries a greater consequence, he added. “The wasteful forfeiture or the tragic mismanagement of the church’s resources are not to be judged merely by the standards recognized by the financial community but by the even more heartbreaking loss of the church’s capacity to care for all those entrusted to our guardianship,” Atlanta Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory said in his Sept. 27 keynote address, “Leading the Church With Mercy and Compassion.” He spoke of the legend of St. Lawrence the Deacon, who, when ordered to bring the treasures of the church to the prefect of Rome, gathered all the poor of the city together and presented them. “The lesson that Lawrence then offered to the Roman prefect, he now offers to all of us, especially to those of you who daily handle the church’s fiscal resources,” said Archbishop Gregory. “Lawrence reminds us that the real treasures that the church continues to possess indeed are those who are the underprivileged, the marginalized, the neglected, the poor and the ostracized of our world.”