Redemptorists A Godsend for Vietnamese War Veterans

Redemptorists A Godsend for Vietnamese War Veterans

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Redemptorist priests and Vietnamese war veterans pose for a photo in early 2018.

ucanews.com reporter

Vietnamese war veterans who lost their limbs and loved ones over four decades ago are getting a dose of Christmas this year from the charitable endeavors of Redemptorists active in the country.

They are helping these former soldiers who fought for South Vietnam restore some of their dignity more than 40 years after the Vietnam War left many of them facing a financially crippled and emotionally scarred future.

“We will hold Christmas celebrations and offer gifts to 6,375 elderly, battle-scarred soldiers throughout southern Vietnam from December 26-28 and on New Year’s Eve,” Father Anthony Le Ngoc Thanh, head of the Redemptorist-run Justice and Peace Office, told ucanews.com.

Many of the veterans suffered greatly during the nation’s civil war, which later spilled out into an international conflict with China and the Soviet Union backing North Vietnam and the United States and its allies throwing its support behind the South.

American war vets have given hundreds of bicycles to poor Vietnamese children in rural areas this year to ease their plight and show their empathy despite suffering themselves during the war.

Father Thanh said the elderly Vietnamese would assemble at the Redemptorists’ headquarters in Ho Chi Minh City and talk about the situation they now find themselves in, as well as the state of their health and other subjects.

As part of the healing process, and at a time of year when many elderly feel alone, they will review their shared past, sing carols and traditional Vietnamese folk songs, play games and eat together.

“We are trying to bring some Christmas joy to those neglected soldiers because Jesus was born into the world to save all people, especially the marginalized,” Father Thanh said.

Such events are not something the communist government generally endorses, but social welfare groups say they serve a crucial role.

While Christmas decorations grace the lobbies of five-star hotels in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City at this time of year, the country is still officially atheist with gaps yet to be plugged when it comes to taking care of the elderly and others who exist on the fringes of society.

This year, the veterans will receive travel expenses of around US$65 each. The Redemptorists were able to raise enough funding from domestic and overseas-based benefactors to cover the costs of the activities scheduled for December, which the church estimates will end up costing a total of 14 billion dong (US$603,000).

Father Thanh said volunteers would visit the homes of elderly soldiers who are too frail or otherwise physically unable to make it to the church’s headquarters, bringing them gifts and giving them comfort.

He said this year his office has offered nearly 5,530 injured veterans food, money, healthcare insurance, medical checkups, treatment costs, reading glasses, wheelchairs, walking sticks, crutches and prosthetic limbs.

The more fortunate, or most in need, may be given somewhere to stay or have their homes repaired at the Redemptorists’ expense. All of the veterans whose relatives have passed away are given basic shelter in the city.

“Our activities aim to help these soldiers regain their self-esteem and gain public recognition for their sacrifices so that they can feel proud of their service,” the priest said.