African-Americans Celebrate Faith, Family, Heritage at San Diego Revival

African-Americans Celebrate Faith, Family, Heritage at San Diego Revival

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SAN DIEGO (CNS) – In the 1930s, Christ the King Parish in a neighborhood just southeast of downtown San Diego was the “mother church” for black Catholics in the city. Racial segregation was the law of the land. Some 50 years later, much has changed in that neighborhood and surrounding ones. A series of landmark laws and rulings ended official segregation at work, schools, housing and public settings though the fight for equality and social justice continues there and across the country. Blacks started moving away, settling elsewhere in San Diego County or even out of state where the cost of living was lower. “We’re all spread out now,” said Deacon Marvin Threatt, from Holy Spirit Parish, one of three parishes with active African-American ministries in the city. “We don’t have the collective community.” The mother church needed a way to invite black Catholics to return to their traditional faith home. Thus began in 1980 the first Revival, a three-night celebration of African-American culture and spirituality at Christ the King. The 38th Annual Revival took place this year February 5-7, this time at Saint Rita’s Parish, which also is in southeastern San Diego.